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Economy Heating & Air 2017
As a senior at Martinsville High School, Emily Seger feels prepared and confident as she graduates and sets her sights toward the next chapter in her life at Franklin College. Seger has grown up in Martinsville with her parents, Rob and Roxanne Seger and her brother, Branden. She appreciates the small town environment and its benefits. “I have gotten to know people and make connections with business people in all areas,” Seger has her sights set on majors in finance and public relations.
She recognizes that her pursuits make for a seemingly odd pairing in business, but her decision is based on knowing herself and from exposure and experiences she has had in her high school career. Part of the reason Seger feels so informed and prepared is because of her participation in the business curriculum and two extra-curricular programs at Martinsville High School. She has taken several business courses including accounting, principles of business management and global economics.
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Ready To Launch

As a senior at Martinsville High School, Emily Seger feels prepared and confident as she graduates and sets her sights toward the next chapter in her life at Franklin College. Seger has grown up in Martinsville with her parents, Rob and Roxanne Seger and her brother, Branden. She appreciates the small town environment and its benefits. “I have gotten to know people and make connections with business people in all areas,”

Seger has her sights set on majors in finance and public relations. She recognizes that her pursuits make for a seemingly odd pairing in business, but her decision is based on knowing herself and from exposure and experiences she has had in her high school career.

Part of the reason Seger feels so informed and prepared is because of her participation in the business curriculum and two extra-curricular programs at Martinsville High School. She has taken several business courses including accounting, principles of business management and global economics.

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Conduit To The Community

Few business owners get to engage in a semi-centennial celebration when it comes to their business, but David Keister is one of those people. His business, Mid-America Radio Group, Inc., or, more commonly known, WCBK AM and 102.3 on your FM dial, will celebrate 50 years on the air this month. The radio station in Martinsville was the first in Morgan County and the first built by Keister. The year was 1967.

Conduit to th e Community David Keister brought the first radio station to Morgan County Keister is not a Morgan County native, he came from Michigan. It was in Middleville, Michigan that he put together a kit and built a radio station in the chicken coop in his backyard on the cusp of becoming a teenager. In those years, radio was the main form of communication in the community. “It was fun to do and went out on the airwaves in the neighborhood,” Keister said.

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Investing in a Community Upgrade

The Morgan County Business Leader reported in the February, 2017 issue about a $225,000 endowment given to the Community Foundation of Morgan County. The endowment represents a change in the philanthropic efforts of three local donors who wish to remain anonymous, but their story also represents a bright, new opportunity for Morgan County.

For years the donors have contributed to charitable organizations throughout Morgan County, according to spokesman, William Blaschke. “All three were born and raised here,” Blaschke said. “We have seen Martinsville (and Morgan County) at its best and at its worst.”

It’s the worst part that troubles them. The three came together and discussed their concerns for the community. “The poverty level is disastrous,” Blaschke said. “It’s such a strain on taxpayers and the county.” Although the trio had been supporting community efforts to reduce poverty, Blaschke said they kept seeing poverty levels going up. There was a cycle of generational poverty taking hold in the county.

“We saw that with our individual donations we were only hitting a little here and a little there. That made us ask if we were being effective and getting the biggest bang for our buck,” Blaschke said. The answer created a shift in their thinking. “We asked what if we were to pool our resources together and go after impact, something that would make a big difference.”

The group developed a three-tiered approach to their investing in the community:

  1. Tier 1 – supporting established charities they felt were doing good work in the community to help the poor get out of poverty
  2. Tier 2 – using education to prevent from going into poverty. Schools are integral to changing the mindset of what students will do after graduation
  3. Tier 3 – creating sustainability. Getting a program in place and financially stabilizing it and then encouraging other business and community leaders to participate
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Politics In Perspective

Some people see opportunity and think, “maybe…” and others, like Representative Peggy Mayfield, see opportunity and say, “Let’s go for it!” The seventh of eight children in an Indianapolis family parented by a pharmaceutical salesman and an IPS teacher, Mayfield grew up with a strong sense of family and work values. She also has a strong penchant for life experiences. It was when she was attending a fire arms class that she met the instructor, Dean, who became her husband in 1984. politics in perspect Peggy Mayfield of Mooresville begins third term Together, they settled in his lifelong hometown of Mooresville to parent four sons, Christopher, Andrew, Austin, and Michael. Before the children arrived, the couple took a leap of faith and jumped into an opportunity in a partnership for an insurance agency.

 

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Cutting Through The Clutter

In 1982 Prince wrote and performed the anthem, 1999, which was the turning point in his career. Brad and Joan Justus must have been listening, because the year 1999 was a major turning point for them, too.
It was in 1999 that the couple got married, moved their family of four to Mooresville, bought a home, and they both changed jobs. Brad quit his new job after three months and launched Jarbo Marketing. Twelve short months with a lifetime of major changes.

Both trained graphic artists have since then added two more children to their family, grown a business that is now housed in its own suite of offices, employs five full-time employees, and contracts with a host of freelancers. To say their year of change was all for the best is making light of their accomplishments. Brad had been in college studying for a career in education when he joined the Army. He was assigned to a nuclear weapon and deployed to West Germany. He was there when the Wall went down in Berlin.

When he returned to the states to finish his education, he found that his perspective had changed and he no longer thought like his other classmates. He changed his major to graphic design and also discovered that the world of business had changed, too. You no longer had to live in a large metropolitan area to be a graphic artist. He could work from anywhere – including the heart of Indiana, close to home in Mooresville.

 

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Environmentally Centered

A midden is the term used by archaeologists for a garbage or trash heap. Archaeologists are known to love middens because of the rich cultural finds uncovered in them. So when it was revealed that Jim Parker was a project manager for an archaeology company at one point in his career, it made sense that he moved into the disposal industry, too. Jim and his wife Marlyn are the co-owners of NuGenesis, Inc. in Mooresville.

Environmentally Centered NuGenesis sustains a sound business through Household Hazardous The name of the company may not be familiar, but if you have ever heard of or attended a Tox-Away Day in your community, you have been in contact with it. NuGenesis is the only company that specializes in bringing together various disposal and recycling services and is Indiana’s largest provider of community Tox-Away Day Collection programs.

Jim and Marlyn wanted to provide a service that improves the community in addition to employing seven people full-time. He said, “There is a sense of what is right to do with people to take care of your family, community and environment. It’s the proper thing to do.”

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